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Posts Tagged ‘Benjamin Wallfisch’

ANNABELLE: CREATION – Benjamin Wallfisch

August 11, 2017 Leave a comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

The latest entry in writer-director-producer James Wan’s ever-expanding horror movie universe is Annabelle: Creation, the prequel to the 2014 film Annabelle. It tells the story of how the possessed doll from the original movie came into existence, expanding on a back story involving a toymaker and his wife whose daughter dies in mysterious circumstances. Twelve years later, the toymaker opens his large, but remote, farmhouse to a nun and several girls from an orphanage that has been closed, offering them a new home, but before long the girls find that something sinister is lurking in the shadows. The film is directed by David Sandberg, stars Stephanie Sigman, Talitha Bateman, Anthony LaPaglia, and Miranda Otto, and has an original score by composer Benjamin Wallfisch. Read more…

A CURE FOR WELLNESS – Benjamin Wallfisch

February 21, 2017 1 comment

acureforwellnessOriginal Review by Jonathan Broxton

A Cure for Wellness is the latest film from Pirates of the Caribbean director Gore Verbinski. It’s a creepy, paranoia-infused horror-thriller starring Dane De Haan as Lockhart, a young and ambitious Wall Street stockbroker who is sent to an idyllic but mysterious ‘wellness center’ in the Swiss Alps to retrieve his company’s CEO, who has been spending time there, and who has sent a troubling letter home to the executives. Upon arrival, Lockhart meets the wellness center’s owner and chief medical officer Heinrich Volmer (Jason Isaacs), some of the patients (Celia Imrie, Ashok Mandanna), and a strange young girl named Hannah (Mia Goth), but when he tries to leave the facility he is involved in a serious car crash. Forced to recuperate at the facility with a badly broken leg, Lockhart soon discovers some troubling information about the history of the place, and quickly comes to believe that things are not as they seem. It’s a visually startling and quite beautiful film which drips with atmosphere, and is very reminiscent of many of the European paranoia-thrillers of the 1970s set in murderous hospitals, especially those by directors like Dario Argento. It’s also completely bat-shit insane in the best possible way, with a denouement that takes grand guignol to violent extremes. Read more…

LIGHTS OUT – Benjamin Wallfisch

August 5, 2016 Leave a comment

lightsoutOriginal Review by Jonathan Broxton

There has been a trend in recent years towards more thoughtful, creative, innovative horror films. Acclaimed works like The Babadook, It Follows, Under the Skin, and others, have begun to push the boundaries of the genre, blending art and terror together, while remaining cognizant of many of the classics that preceded it. Lights Out is another one of those films which may soon join that list of outstanding contemporary chillers by playing on one of the most innate and universal fears of them all: fear of the dark. Directed by Swedish filmmaker David Sandberg – remaking his own acclaimed 3-minute Youtube short film – the film stars Maria Bello, Teresa Palmer, and Gabriel Bateman as members of a family who are terrorized by a supernatural being which only appears when the lights are out. Read more…

Best Scores of 2015 – Asia

January 27, 2016 3 comments

The sixth and final installment in my series of articles looking at the best “under the radar” scores from around the world concentrates on music from films from Asia, although all of main ones this year are from the far eastern nation of Japan, with a couple of interlopers from Iran and the Lebanon. In this article, I’m taking a deeper look at several truly excellent works, which range in scope from anime movies and prestigious TV series to fantasy adventures, small-scale dramas, and religious epics. Read more…

THE ESCAPIST – Benjamin Wallfisch

April 3, 2009 1 comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

The Escapist is a British drama/thriller directed by Rupert Wyatt and starring Brian Cox as Frank Perry, a convicted murderer serving a life sentence without parole. When he learns that his estranged daughter has fallen ill, Frank determines to make peace with her before she dies; as such, he develops an ingenious escape plan, and recruits a dysfunctional band of fellow prisoners and misfits – Joseph Fiennes, Damian Lewis, Dominic Cooper, Steven Mackintosh – with the unique skills required to help him break out.

The score for The Escapist is by up-and-coming British composer Benjamin Wallfisch, who has earned acclaim for his solo work on scores such as Dear Wendy, as well as for his Read more…

DEAR WENDY – Benjamin Wallfisch

September 23, 2005 Leave a comment

dearwendyOriginal Review by Jonathan Broxton

A new name in the film scoring community, until now Benjamin Wallfisch has been best known for his work orchestrating and conducting Dario Marianelli’s acclaimed scores Pride & Prejudice, The Brothers Grimm and V for Vendetta. What may not be immediately apparent from those projects is that the 27-year-old Englishman is a talented hugely talented composer in his own right – as his debut score for Dear Wendy attests. A Danish/British co-production directed by Thomas Vinterberg and produced by Lars Von Trier, Dear Wendy stars Jamie Bell as Dick, a young boy in a nameless, timeless American town, who establishes a gang of misfits who are in love with guns as a way of livening up their lives. It’s an unusual, typically Scandinavian film about youthful angst, socio-political issues, and alienation, which opened in the UK in August 2005, but has not received wide distribution in North America beyond the festival circuit, despite actors such as Bill Pullman appearing in supporting roles. Read more…