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Archive for January, 2005

HIDE AND SEEK – John Ottman

January 28, 2005 Leave a comment

hideandseekOriginal Review by Peter Simons

Hide and Seek is a new thriller-with-a-twist from director John Polson, who previously scored a hit with the “Fatal Attraction for teenagers” film Swimfan. Following the untimely death of his wife, psychologist David Callaway (Robert De Niro) and his young daughter Emily (Dakota Fanning) find that life in the Big Apple is not helping them in the grieving process. Seeking solace and a fresh start, the father and daughter move from the city to the countryside of upstate New York, acquiring a rambling farmhouse away from everything that reminds them of their past. Eager for his daughter to settle in the community, David is at first delighted when Emily proclaims to have a new “friend” named Charlie. Though he only seems to exists in the girls imagination, Charlie quickly has a profound effect on the Callaway’s life, interfering with David’s tentative relationship with local woman Elizabeth (Elizabeth Shue), and attracting the attention of a fellow psychiatrist (Famke Janssen) and the local cop (Dylan Baker). Before long, Charlie’s mischievous antics turn very serious, leading David to believe that the relationship between Charlie and Emily may not quite be what it seems… Read more…

ASSAULT ON PRECINCT 13 – Graeme Revell

January 21, 2005 Leave a comment

assaultonprecinct13Original Review by Peter Simons

A remake of John Carpenter’s 1976 classic western-meets-urban ghetto thriller, Assault on Precinct 13 stars Ethan Hawke as police officer Roenick, whose precinct is used to shelter a group of policemen and criminals, including crime lord Bishop (Lawrence Fishburne), when their convoy is forced to stop overnight at the precinct due to bad weather, despite the fact that the building has just been closed down for good, and has been cut off from power and communications. Things take an even nastier turn when the precinct is surrounded by an unknown, but heavily armed group ready to kill everybody inside – thereby forcing the cops and the prisoners into an uneasy alliance as they fight off a common enemy. Heralded by most critics as a surprisingly good remake of the 1976 version, other reviewers have slammed director Jean-François Richet’s film for lacking the eerie tension that made Carpenter’s movie a classic. Read more…

THE CHORUS (LES CHORISTES) – Bruno Coulais

January 14, 2005 Leave a comment

thechorusOriginal Review by Peter Simons

France’s submission for this year’s Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars, The Chorus (Les Choristes) tells the somber story of music teacher Clement Mathieu (Gerard Jugnot) accepting a position at a remote school for difficult students. While the school’s headmaster believes in strict discipline and runs the place like a prison, the new teacher believes that a little love and goodwill can go a long way. As Mathieu succeeds in bringing his deviant pupils together in a choir, they discover a hidden talent within themselves. Read more…

ELEKTRA – Christophe Beck

January 14, 2005 Leave a comment

elektraOriginal Review by Peter Simons

A spin-off of Daredevil, Elektra is the latest entry in a long series of comic book adaptations. Starring Jennifer Garner of Alias-fame as the titular character, the movie tells the story of a warrior assassin with a heart who leads a secluded life only to spring into action when a secret order calls upon her to execute a widowing Mark Miller (Goran Visnjic) and his teen aged daughter Abby (Kirsten Prout). When she actually befriends them and refuses to kill them, she ends up protecting them from other assassins and ninjas. The movie is directed by Rob Bowman who previously directed episodes of The X-Files and its spin-off series The Lone Gunman as well as the motion picture Reign of Fire. Read more…

RACING STRIPES – Mark Isham

January 14, 2005 Leave a comment

racingstripesOriginal Review by Jonathan Broxton

Considering that 2005 is just a few weeks old, it has already seen a film music landmark: the best score of Mark Isham’s career to date. Despite being best known for his jazz-inspired trumpet performances and beautiful orchestral works such as the Oscar-nominated A River Runs Through It and Fly Away Home, he had often in the past professed a desire to write a big, thematic, heroic orchestral score: his “Star Wars”, as he puts it. Obviously, Racing Stripes is in a totally different genre, but this could well be the very score he was describing. Read more…