Archive

Archive for August, 2007

THE INVASION – John Ottman

August 17, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

The umpteenth remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers to reach big screens since Don Siegel’s 1956 original, the latest version – The Invasion – was directed by Oliver Hirschbiegel (the acclaimed German director of Der Untergang) and stars Nicole Kidman, Daniel Craig and Jeremy Northam, and again tells the tale of an alien organism which comes to earth and begins to systematically overtake humanity by creating emotionless clones of people, which then murder their human counterpart and assume their identity.

John Ottman’s score is one of his better recent efforts, a creepy orchestral and choral score which also uses a healthy dose of electronics to impressive effect. The opening cue, “Life Goes On/Dance of the Cells”, is actually slightly reminiscent of the way Denny Zeitlin opened his score for the 1978 version of the story Read more…

THE LAST LEGION – Patrick Doyle

August 17, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

A historical action-drama set in the final, crumbling days of the western Roman Empire, The Last Legion stars young Thomas Sangster as 12-year-old Romulus Augustus, whose previously privileged life takes a terrible turn when, on the day he is crowned emperor of Rome, the empire falls into terrible anarchy. Banished to the island of Capri to live for the rest of his life, Romulus learns of the legend of a mystical sword which was once owned by Julius Caesar, and which he believes may help him return to power. With the help of his teacher Ambrosinus (Ben Kingsley) and the last loyal legionnaire Aurelius (Colin Firth), Romulus escapes the island, and goes to the distant province of Britannia, to search for the sword and gather together a legion of soldiers who will fight for the final glory of the Roman Empire. Read more…

SUPERBAD – Lyle Workman

August 17, 2007 1 comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

The unexpected comedy success of 2007, Superbad follows the fortunes of Seth and Evan (Jonah Hill and Michael Cera), inseparable best friends who are destined to be parted when they enroll at different colleges. During their last weeks of high school, and realizing that they only have a short time left together, the intrepid duo hatch a plan to finally fulfill their lifelong ambition: losing their virginity. With the help of their nerdy friend Fogell (Christopher Mintz-Plasse), the guys embark on adventure to score enough alcohol to take to a party where they can inebriate the girls of their dreams, Jules and Becca, and engage in full-on regret sex. Hilarity, as they say, ensues. Read more…

AS YOU LIKE IT – Patrick Doyle

August 17, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

I’ve always felt that Kenneth Branagh is the only modern director who ‘gets’ Shakespeare. Whether he’s playing it comparatively straight, as he did with Henry V and Hamlet, or whether he puts a little spin on the proceedings, as he did by turning Love’s Labour’s Lost into a Cole Porter musical, Branagh seems to have a deep love of the Bard’s work, and an uncanny knack of turning his usually somewhat impenetrable language into something clearly understandable, and which conveys common human emotions and timeless themes.

As You Like It, Branagh’s sixth adaptation of a Shakespeare play, is one of the ‘spun’ ones, transplanting it from its original setting in rural France, and re-imagining it in 19th century Japan Read more…

RUSH HOUR 3 – Lalo Schifrin

August 10, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Clark Douglas

Perhaps the least necessary sequel of the summer, “Rush Hour 3” still managed to scrape up a decent amount of money, proving… um… some terribly depressing point, I would imagine. The film stars Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker as a couple of cops who have to find terribly contrived and exotic ways to solve various crimes. The talented supporting cast includes Philip Baker Hall, Max Von Sydow, and Roman Polanski, and not one of them has a single interesting thing to do. It’s a pretty mediocre movie, and as with the previous two “Rush Hour” efforts, the highlights are Jackie Chan’s stunts (much more limited in this installment) and Lalo Schifrin’s score. Read more…

STARDUST – Ilan Eshkeri

August 10, 2007 1 comment

Original Review by Clark Douglas

With the enormous success of the “Harry Potter” and “Lord of the Rings” films, we have seen endless fantasy productions popping up left and right. In the past few weeks, I’ve seen trailer after trailer for upcoming fantasy films that all look roughly the same. “The Golden Compass”. “The Spiderwick Chronicles”. “The Seeker: The Dark is Rising”. “The Dragon Wars”. “Beowulf”. “The Water Horse: Legend of the Deep”. It goes on and on. Some of these will undoubtedly be better than others, but they all basically look alike, portentous journeys into tired lands of “mystery” and “wonder”. Ho-hum. Read more…

BECOMING JANE – Adrian Johnston

August 3, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

With the likes of Pride & Prejudice and Sense & Sensibility being such popular works of both the written and visual media, it was only a matter of time before someone made a screen biography of their author, the erstwhile Jane Austen. Julian Jarrold’s film Becoming Jane is just such a film; American star Anne Hathaway adopts an English actress to play the pre-fame author, growing up in 18th century Hampshire, and falling in love with a handsome Irishman named Tom Lefroy (James McAvoy); Jane’s encounters with him, and her dalliances with the societal niceties of the day seek to shape her literary style and her outlook on life. Read more…