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Archive for March, 2007

THE LAST MIMZY – Howard Shore

March 23, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Clark Douglas

Some have said that “The Last Mimzy” is the most hopeful and optimistic movie to come along in some time, and they are quite right. “Optimistic” is an appropriate word, perhaps “deluded” is another. The movie strains so hard to create a world of beautiful fantasy that it very nearly snaps. This bothered me quite a bit, as many portions of “The Last Mimzy” feel like a deceptive set-up to a freaky horror movie, but no, everything goes smashingly from start to finish. Then again, the movie wasn’t made for me, and it’s a bit difficult to gauge how children will respond to it. I suspect a lot of them will like it well enough, probably because it doesn’t treat them like mentally challenged schizophrenics. Read more…

JOURNEY FROM THE FALL – Christopher Wong

March 23, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

Mikael Carlsson’s groundbreaking record label Movie Score Media has been responsible for releasing some hidden musical gems over the last couple of years, but Christopher Wong’s score for the Oriental drama Journey From the Fall is one of the best. The film, which was directed by Ham Tran, tells the story of a Vietnamese family who, thirteen years after the end of the American involvement in the conflict there, still cope with the repercussions of the war on their every day lives. Eventually the family uproots from their spiritual home and moves to America, only to find that life in the new world is no less difficult. Read more…

THE WIND THAT SHAKES THE BARLEY – George Fenton

March 16, 2007 1 comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

The winner of the Palme D’Or at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival, The Wind that Shakes the Barley is a film from left-wing director Ken Loach, about the Republican movement in early 20th century Ireland, prior to the separation of the country under British and Irish rule, which eventually led to the long-lasting bloody conflict known as ‘The Troubles’ between Catholics and Protestants. Cillian Murphy and Padraic Delaney star as brothers Damien and Teddy, whose lives are torn apart by the increasing sectarian violence, and the political struggles which taint their formerly peaceful lives. Read more…

PREMONITION – Klaus Badelt

March 16, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Clark Douglas

Let’s just be upfront about things. “Premonition”, the latest Sandra Bullock vehicle, is a pretty ridiculous time-bending film, as almost every time-bending film is. Let’s face it, very few movies have been able to pull off a “time warp” theory convincingly… but some of them work in spite of it. I have been unusually kind to these movies in recent days. I gave Bullock’s previous time-bending romance “The Lake House” a kind review, and also tossed some generous comments in the direction of Tony Scott’s “Déjà Vu”. However, I will not show such mercy to “Premonition”, and as with all of those other films, my opinion has very little to do with the time warp element. Read more…

NOMAD – Carlo Siliotto

March 16, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

When Italian composer Carlo Siliotto was nominated for a Golden Globe for his score for Nomad, the film music world let out a collective “huh?” The film had not yet played in cinemas in the United States; a large majority had not even HEARD of the film, let alone seen it or heard its score; and Carlo Siliotto is not a composer many people would list as being a regular awards contender. The utterly amazing thing, though, is that the Hollywood Foreign Press got it absolutely right. Nomad is stunningly good score, full of rich themes and ethnic mystery, which undoubtedly would have gone on to greater acclaim had its accompanying movie not been so comparatively obscure. Read more…

LA VIE EN ROSE – Christopher Gunning

March 16, 2007 Leave a comment

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

The legendary singer Edith Piaf, who died in 1963, remains a national icon of French musical culture to this day, whose razor-blade voice was unmistakable, and whose massive stage presence belied her diminutive stature. Director Olivier Dahan’s biography of Piaf, La Môme (released internationally as “La Vie en Rose”, after one of her most famous songs), stars Marion Cotillard in an extraordinary performance as the Little Sparrow, and features supporting turns from such respected Gallic actors as Sylvie Testud, Pascal Greggory, Emmanuelle Seigner and Gérard Depardieu. Read more…

DEAD SILENCE – Charlie Clouser

March 16, 2007 2 comments

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

The popularity of the Saw and Hostel franchises, and the subsequent arrival of the so-called ‘torture porn’ sub-genre, has spawned a number of imitations, one of which is this film: Dead Silence. Directed by James Wan and starring Ryan Kwanten, Amber Valletta, Donnie Wahlberg and Bob Gunton, the film is a mean-spirited horror flick about a man who, having endured his wife’s ghastly and unexplained death, returns to his home town, to try to find the connection between a series of grisly murders and the old ghost tale of Mary Shaw and her vengeful ventriloquists dummies. Read more…