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Archive for August, 2016

RUDOLF THE BLACK CAT [RUDORUFU TO IPPAIATTENA] – Naoki Sato

August 5, 2016 Leave a comment

rudolftheblackcatOriginal Review by Jonathan Broxton

Rudolf the Black Cat is a Japanese animated family adventure film directed by Kunihiko Yuyama and Motonori Sakakibara. It follows the adventures of a suburban ‘indoor kitten’ named Rudolf, who has always longed to roam the streets of his little neighborhood. However, when Rudolf gets his wish and is accidentally abandoned miles away from his home in an unfamiliar big city by his owner, he must team up with a street cat called Gottalot in order to find his way back home. Read more…

LIGHTS OUT – Benjamin Wallfisch

August 5, 2016 Leave a comment

lightsoutOriginal Review by Jonathan Broxton

There has been a trend in recent years towards more thoughtful, creative, innovative horror films. Acclaimed works like The Babadook, It Follows, Under the Skin, and others, have begun to push the boundaries of the genre, blending art and terror together, while remaining cognizant of many of the classics that preceded it. Lights Out is another one of those films which may soon join that list of outstanding contemporary chillers by playing on one of the most innate and universal fears of them all: fear of the dark. Directed by Swedish filmmaker David Sandberg – remaking his own acclaimed 3-minute Youtube short film – the film stars Maria Bello, Teresa Palmer, and Gabriel Bateman as members of a family who are terrorized by a supernatural being which only appears when the lights are out. Read more…

FLIGHT OF THE NAVIGATOR – Alan Silvestri

August 4, 2016 Leave a comment

flightofthenavigatorTHROWBACK THIRTY

Original Review by Jonathan Broxton

A science fiction film for children, Flight of the Navigator was a popular hit at box offices during the late summer of 1986. Directed by Randal Kleiser, the film starred 12-year old Joey Kramer as David, a young boy who lives in Florida in 1978 with his parents and young brother. After accidentally falling into a ravine near his home on the evening of the fourth of July, David awakes to find that eight years have passed, but he has not aged a day; he returns home to his shocked parents, who believed he was dead. Before long, various government agencies come knocking on David’s door, revealing that he was apparently abducted by an alien spaceship on the night of his disappearance, and that the spaceship – which subsequently crashed, and is now being held by NASA – appears to be trying to communicate with him telepathically. The film co-stars Cliff De Young, Veronica Cartwright, Howard Hesseman, a young Sarah Jessica Parker, features the voice of Paul Reubens, and has an original score by Alan Silvestri. Read more…

JASON BOURNE – John Powell and David Buckley

August 2, 2016 1 comment

jasonbourneOriginal Review by Jonathan Broxton

Jason Bourne is the latest film in the series of action-espionage films based on the novels by Robert Ludlum, after the original Bourne Identity in 2002, The Bourne Supremacy in 2004, The Bourne Ultimatum in 2007, and the spin-off Bourne Legacy in 2012. Paul Greengrass returns to the director’s chair and Matt Damon returns to play one of his iconic roles one more time; this time, the plot revolves around Bourne, a former CIA assassin, finding out more about his past, how he was first recruited into the ultra-secret black ops Treadstone programme in the first place, and how these things relate to the death of his father. The film co-stars Oscar-winner Alicia Vikander, Tommy Lee Jones, Bourne veteran Julia Stiles, Vincent Cassel, and Riz Ahmed, and allows Bourne to trek across the globe from Athens to Berlin to London and Las Vegas, as he searches for answers about his past. Read more…

KINGS ROW – Erich Wolfgang Korngold

August 1, 2016 1 comment

kingsrow100 GREATEST SCORES OF ALL TIME

Original Review by Craig Lysy

Kings Row continued Erich Wolfgang Korngold’s late career transition from period piece and swashbuckling adventure films to adult dramas whose darker tones and complex narratives, which lent themselves well to his operatic writing. Hal Wallis of Warner Brothers saw a powerful social narrative after reading Henry Bellamann’s stunning novel Kings Row (1940) and immediately secured film rights. The story follows Parris Mitchell of small town America circa 1900 as he sees the idyllic and pristine veneer of his Midwest town slowly stripped bare before his eyes with a grim and damning commentary, which included sadism, suicide, homosexuality, insanity, euthanasia, and murder. When compared to the novel, the film is tame, as the Hays Code censored most of the more sordid and controversial elements of the plot. Nevertheless the film did find its day in the sun both commercially and critically, earning three Academy Award nominations including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Cinematography. Read more…